Food


This makes sense to me:

Why Do Sandwiches Taste Better When Someone Else Makes Them?

By Daniel Kahneman

When you make your own sandwich, you anticipate its taste as you’re working on it. And when you think of a particular food for a while, you become less hungry for it later. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, for example, found that imagining eating M&Ms makes you eat fewer of them. It’s a kind of specific satiation, just as most people find room for dessert when they couldn’t have another bite of their steak. The sandwich that another person prepares is not “preconsumed” in the same way.

Via: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/10/02/magazine/29mag-food-issue.html#/cooking

QUICK! What keeps pre-packaged shredded cheese from clumping, low-fat ice cream creamy, and pre-made milk shakes smooth? You guessed it! WOOD PULP. They call it “cellulose,” but it’s just powdered wood pulp. The industry loves this stuff. It’s cheap. It helps stabilize food, lowers fat content, increases fiber. Did I say it’s cheap?

Via http://www.foodrenegade.com/would-like-some-wood-pulp-your-shredded-cheese/

Available now at the App Store, an app to let the unborn pick its name: Kick To Pick

Is the app that lets your beautiful bump choose their own name from thousands of baby names or even a shortlist created by you.”

The app plays selected names, with the iPhone over the big bump.  When it senses a kick, that’s the name that the fetus picked.

My reactions:

  1. If you’re lame enough to need an iPhone app to pick your baby’s name, you’re probably too lame to have an iPhone.
  2. If you believe that the fetus is really picking its name, you’re certainly too lame to have a baby.
  3. Yet, I have to admire the entrepreneurial spirit that could dream up and sell such high-tech snake oil.

The Japanese really like their watermelon:

A prized Japanese watermelon fetched nearly $4,000 on Monday at an auction in Sapporo. Yes, $4,000.

But before you choke on your own slice of citrullus, that four-figure price tag is actually a steep fall from the fruit’s peak season several years ago, in what may be a sign that the country’s highly regarded luxury fruit market is the latest victim of tightening consumer purse strings.

The rare Densuke watermelon, a solidly black, smooth-as-a-bowling-ball gourd, sold on the first day of seasonal bidding for 300,000 yen, which translates into about $3,740, according to the Sapporo Central Wholesale Market. While the seeds aren’t gold, the fruit is lauded for its crispy texture and extra sweet juice. And grown exclusively in Hokkaido, there are only about 100 of the stripeless watermelons available on the first day it goes on sale each year….

The highest-ever paid price for the fruit was 650,000 yen, or about $8,100, at the Maruka Asahikawa Wholesale Market in 2007.

I’ll stick with the green melons, even if I have to deal with the seeds.

(A customer comes up to the counter, and looks at a bottle of wine we’re sampling.)

Customer: “What’s this?”

Me: “It’s a tempranillo.”

Customer: “What is a ‘temper-nillo’?”

Me: “It’s a red grape from Spain.”

(The customer picks up the sample cup, and looks at it in confusion.)

Customer: “This is a grape? I could’ve sworn this was wine.”*knocks sample back* “How about that!”

Via: http://notalwaysright.com/page/5

For the Scot who has everything:

We know that flavors with a Scottish twist are popular because Haggis and Cracked Black Pepper is our best-selling flavor,” Kirstin Mackie, managing director of Mackie’s, said in a written statement.

Haggis is the legendary blend of various sheep organs and parts traditionally simmered in a casing made of sheep stomach and served with great ceremony at holiday banquets and other festive Highland and Lowland occasions.

Mackie said it was able to replicate the distinct flavor of haggis, which is described as “nutty,” on chips along with a shot of pepper. The chips won Product of the Year at the 2010 Scottish Food and Drink Excellence Awards.

In case Dave Hartley’s still wondering what to get Catherine for Christmas….

Via Tired of BBQ chips? Here comes haggis – UPI.com.

One more item for the “I’d not have thought of this” list:

Located in the Xinjiekou subway station, in Nanjing, China, this particular vending machine is full of live hairy crabs and crab vinegar, making it available to enjoy seafood on the go.

The quirky food dispenser was installed on the 1st of October, and at first, it surprised even the Chinese. People would stop and stare at the crustaceans inside, and others would even take out their cameras and take photos of them. Business was out to a slow start, with only one hairy crab sold per day, but as people got used to the thought of buying live crabs from a vending machine, the figures jumped to an impressive 200 crabs a day. People noticed they were cheaper than the crabs found at the local food markets, and buying them on their daily commute they also saved precious time.

Depending on size, crabs can be bought for 10 RMB, 12 RMB, 25 RMB and 50 RMB. They all seem dead, but their actually just hibernating due to the low temperature in the vending machine.

via Oddity Central – Weird Places, Odd Events, Bizarre News, Strange People and A Lot More – Part 5.

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