Geography


More than a thousand furious rail passengers stormed a station office after they noticed the train they were on had gone 980km in the WRONG direction.

As the packed service pulled into the Indian city of Warangal people on board went berserk as they realised they were five hours away from where they should have been and no staff on board had noticed….

It was when it arrived at an interchange at Vijayawada it went wrong, as it was due to swing north to its eventual destination of Varanasi, one of India’s holiest cities.

India’s signalling system is run on codes but instead of entering the three-letters for its next intended stop Bhubaneswar (BBS) staff put in the code for Bilaspur (BSP) sending the train in completely the wrong direction.

Via: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2039667/Indian-train-travels-980km-wrong-direction-rail-staff-noticing.html#ixzz1YzFZi0gH

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Bolivia’s famous Salar de Uyuni: At an elevation of 3653 metres, the largest salt flat in the world (12,106 square kilometres) was formed when the prehistoric Lago Minchin evaporated.

Salt table tops

Several compelling statistics remind us to be thankful that we are Americans.

http://www.fubiz.net/2011/05/25/village-of-100-people/#more-160757

Ever want to rent a country?

You’ve heard of renting a palace, renting a mega yacht, even renting an island. How about renting a country? For $70,000 a night with a two-night minimum and a very strict cancellation policy, you can rent Liechtenstein. Yes, the entire country.  You can rent the country for a conference, a party – whatever you drum up for you and your 900 closest friends.

Now, if you’re forgetting your high school geography, Liechtenstein is a tiny Alpine country – population 35,000 – tucked between Austria and Switzerland.

So what to do with your own nation? Well, how about starting with a wine tasting at the prince’s estate while watching your own fireworks show. You want to make this a very personal experience? You can rename the city streets and town squares as you wish and even print your own temporary currency with your face on it.

Now, if you do decide Liechtenstein is the perfect place for your party, please don’t cause too much of a ruckus. The nation has only a handful of police officers and no military.

Surely, breakfast included.

Via: http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2011/04/25/for-70k-a-night-you-can-rent-a-country/?hpt=Sbin

Mechelen, Netherlands

The late 17th century Stedenboek (book of cities) by Dutch cartographer Frederik de Wit is one of the rarest map books in the world. Only four copies are know to exist and the finest version has been digitised and uploaded by the National Library of The Netherlands. [Flash and html formats are available]

De Wit was among the last of the renowned cartographers in what is referred to as theGolden Age of Dutch cartography. Common to all his work was superb engraving and exceptional colouring qualities that resulted in maps of unique beauty and historical interest.

Imagine trying to draw those curving streets without the benefit of an aerial view.

Via: http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/

 

At the link below, video of a very impressively-frozen lighthouse on Lake Erie:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/weather/8205402/Ohio-lighthouse-turned-into-ice-by-cold-weather.html

What luck: ticketed for speeding by the same cop — twice — 12,000 miles apart:

The Daily Mail reports that the unnamed driver was pulled over by officer Andy Flitton in the UK two years ago and again recently in New Zealand. The unlucky driver, who island-hopped to New Zealand after 12 years in the UK, recognized the ticket-giver as the same man who caught him breaking the law on the A5 near London. The officer had recently relocated southThe Daily Mail reports that the unnamed driver was pulled over by officer Andy Flitton in the UK two years agThe Daily Mail reports that the unnamed driver was pulled over by officer Andy Flitton in the UK two years ago and again recently in New Zealand. The unlucky driver, who island-hopped to New Zealand after 12 years in the UK, recognized the ticket-giver as the same man who caught him breaking the law on the A5 near London. The officer had recently relocated south after 26 years on the force in England.

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