Politics


Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies. – Groucho Marx

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Margaret Thatcher, God bless her, still can hit the nail on the head … and with her delightful acerbic flair!

“Those who imagine that a politician would make a better figurehead than a hereditary monarch might perhaps make the acquaintance of more politicians.” – Margaret Thatcher

Via: http://conservativehome.blogs.com/thetorydiary/2011/04/twelve-top-tory-quotes-in-support-of-monarchy.html

“The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics.” ~ Thomas Sowell

 

Peggy Noonan had one of her best-ever op-eds this week, analyizing Tuesday’s election.  It contains more highly perceptive analysis in a short space than I’ve seen do in a long time.

Ms. Noonan, a former Reagan speechwriter, supported Mr. Obama in 2008.  Clearly, she has soured on the President:

On to the aftermath of the election. On Wednesday, President Obama gave a news conference to share his thoughts. Viewers would have found it disappointing if there had been any viewers. The president is speaking, in effect, to an empty room. From my notes five minutes in: “This wet blanket, this occupier of the least interesting corner of the faculty lounge, this joy-free zone, this inert gas.” By the end I was certain he will never produce a successful stimulus because he is a human depression.

Actually I thought the worst thing you can say about a president: He won’t even make a good former president.

His detachment is so great, it is even from himself.

She’s also no fan of Sarah Palin, indirectly calling her a “nincompoop”.

Near the end of the article, Ms. Noonan makes a point that many of us — but, strangely, not she — argued in 2008:

Here is an old tradition badly in need of return: You have to earn your way into politics. You should go have a life, build a string of accomplishments, then enter public service. And you need actual talent: You have to be able to bring people in and along. You can’t just bully them, you can’t just assert and taunt, you have to be able to persuade.

Let’s hope that the voters are waking up to that sentiment.  An empty suit, no matter how inspiring, is still an empty suit.

 

“Less we can.”

By Mark Grannis, the Libertarian Party’s candidate for Maryland’s 8th Congressional District, a Washington suburb

via George F. Will – What’s at stake Tuesday.



Today is the 25th anniversary of Leon Klinghoffer’s murder by Palestinian terrorists.

Klinghoffer and his wife Marilyn were celebrating their 36th wedding anniversary with a Mediterranean cruise on the liner Achille Lauro.  Palestinians seized the ship, murdered Mr. Klinghoffer, an American Jew, as he sat in his wheelchair, then forced the crew to shove his  body into the sea.  His corpse eventually washed up on the Syrian coast.

The Foreign Secretary of the PLO initially claimed that Mrs. Klinghoffer had killed her husband for the insurance money, but the PLO eventually had to admit responsibility in the face of so many witnesses to the shooting.

Last year, the leader of the terrorists gained early release from an Italian prison “for good behavior.”

Mrs. Klinghoffer, who died of colon cancer a few months after her husband’s murder, must have had incredible strength of spirit.  Her call to her daughters from the Achille Lauro included the admonition,

Do your crying now. We have a lot of work when I come home.”

She did not want her husband’s death to be in vain.  And the Klinghoffers’ daughters, Lisa and Ilsa, still work to keep their father’s memory alive.

Sadly, terrorism is still an accepted tactic in much of the world.  So this 25th anniversary is a reminder that all of us still have a lot of work to do.


Links:  Article on Klinghoffer family

Article on terrorist’s early release

 

 

A political sign, by either party, that effectively uses subtle humor is about as common as an honest politician.  Thanks to the web, we can see one example of that rara avis:

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